PixyStyk
everyonedies:

dictatorboy:

My saint bernard lets the outside cats sleep with him

ARE YOU SERIOUS

everyonedies:

dictatorboy:

My saint bernard lets the outside cats sleep with him

ARE YOU SERIOUS

IF FIRE WERE WATER

elecktrokidd:

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this is far too mesmerizing not to reblog

becausebirds:

Conversation with Raymond the Raven.

This Raven sounds like R2-D2. The bird laughs with the man at the end of the video. Amazing.

squishietechies:

One of my biggest insecurities is my stretch marks. After I had my son I was covered in them. It’s been over two years and the deep gashes have made no progress on disappearing.

So in an attempt to try to not hate them (and myself) as much, here they are.

pleatedjeans:

via
scissorsandthread:

Leather Cuff Jeans | Brit + Co
I’m not a big jeans wearer - my official uniform is dress, cardigan & leggings. But after seeing this DIY I’m thinking I might need to sew up a pair of leather cuff jeans to add to my routine! If you’re going to make yourself a pair, then make sure you have a heavy duty needle in your machine so you don’t end up with a broken needle.

scissorsandthread:

Leather Cuff Jeans | Brit + Co

I’m not a big jeans wearer - my official uniform is dress, cardigan & leggings. But after seeing this DIY I’m thinking I might need to sew up a pair of leather cuff jeans to add to my routine! If you’re going to make yourself a pair, then make sure you have a heavy duty needle in your machine so you don’t end up with a broken needle.

sepedesign:

By Josep Prat Sorolla
FB
IG

mrcheyl:

dre3k:

kayla-kunt:

yuu-ung:

jeffreycaluag:

"Anaconda" - Nicki Minaj 

Choreography by: Jeffrey Caluag & Dimitri Mendez

They went in

This gave me eternal life.

lol they go in at :38 though

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain – Elizabeth “Lady Bare-Knuckles” Stokes
Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports? Think again! From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men. Back then, boxing was not like the boxing of today, not by a long shot. The venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys. Rules differed from venue to venue but, for the most part, fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type of set-up. Some fights even included deadly weapons, such as clubs, swords, and staves. Needless to say, injury and death were common.
One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted for most of the 1720s. In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas. Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge:
 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”
Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin. Later in the evening, she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.
After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”. After marrying her husband James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches. Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bare-knuckle boxing. Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists. Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well. She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.
By the mid 19th century, women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organisations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain  Elizabeth “Lady Bare-Knuckles” Stokes

Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports? Think again! From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men. Back then, boxing was not like the boxing of today, not by a long shot. The venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys. Rules differed from venue to venue but, for the most part, fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type of set-up. Some fights even included deadly weapons, such as clubs, swords, and staves. Needless to say, injury and death were common.

One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted for most of the 1720s. In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas. Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge:

 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”

Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin. Later in the evening, she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.

After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”. After marrying her husband James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches. Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bare-knuckle boxing. Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists. Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well. She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.

By the mid 19th century, women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organisations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

youcantseemyinsidefeels:

wighthound:

luvzi12:

This sign is supposed to show you which things are forbidden. But it just creates the coolest dog ever


fuck u i don’t do what u tell me

the most interesting dog in the world

youcantseemyinsidefeels:

wighthound:

luvzi12:

This sign is supposed to show you which things are forbidden. But it just creates the coolest dog ever

fuck u i don’t do what u tell me

the most interesting dog in the world

kingdomy:

Stephen Oachs

archiemcphee:

The beautiful woodpile mosaic owls are the work of Gary Tallman, an 82-year-old Montana resident who turns the chore of stacking firewood into an art form. Over the years Tallman has learned the many colors found in various types of cordwood and uses them as his palette.

“Everybody doesn’t notice how many tones in the wood there are,” Marilyn Tallman said of her husband’s eye for the subtleties of wood. “He sees beauty in all kinds of things.”

“Generally speaking, we can find almost all the colors and tones in the woods that we harvest,” Tallman said of his woodpile mosaic. “Except for black,” he confessed. “We don’t have any ebony around here so I do color the ends of some of the black ones. But the others are pretty much just the way they come out of nature.”

Tallman’s ongoing owl theme is based on the birds who live in the trees around his home in Montana’s Little Belt Mountains. Each piece begins with a sketch drawn on graph paper. After first chopping and splitting the wood, Tallman sorts the various hues into separate piles. Then the process of stacking begins. He estimates that it takes him about 20 hours to stack one of his mosaics.

Click here to learn more about Gary Tallman and his firewood mosaics.

[via Bored Panda and the Great Falls Tribune]

hanukkahlewinsky:

friend: “i can only bring one friend. wanna go?” 

me:

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